All the Men of the Bible - Friday, October 11, 2013

Felix [Fē'lĭx]—happy, prosperous. A cruel Roman governor of Judea, appointed by the Emperor Claudius, whose freedman he was (Acts 23:24, 26; 24:2-27; 25:14). Felix is described by Tacitus as a bad and cruel governor, even though the title of “most excellent” was given to him.

The Man Who Procrastinated

As a true preacher, Paul pressed home the truth until it pricked the conscience of Felix so much so that he “trembled.” He did not resent Paul’s plain speaking but postponed the interview “till a more convenient season.” Such a “convenient season,” however, did not come, and Felix became a type of many whose consciences are stirred by the preached Word, but whose hopes of eternal security are ruined by a like procrastination. The two sworn enemies of the soul are “Yesterday” and “Tomorrow.”

Yesterday slays its thousands. Past sins plunge many into darkness and despair. Priceless opportunities were trampled upon, and the harvest is past. But God says there is mercy still and free forgiveness through repentance.

Tomorrow slays its tens of thousands. Vows, promises, resolutions are never fulfilled. “Some other time,” many say, when urged to repent and believe. They fail to realize that now is the acceptable time. How pitiful it is that the convenient season never dawns for them! The pathway to their hell is strewn with good resolutions, and as they cross “The Great Divide,” the mocking voice cries out: “Too late! Too late!”

Devotional content drawn from All the Men of the Bible by Herbert Lockyer. Used with permission.

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